I’ve added demos to show how rightplants4me.co.uk can help you identify plants and plant information

December 3, 2012

I’ve added demos to show how my interative plant identifier and pruning guide website works. This link will take you to the Articles section where I have various demos wesite is How to use rightplants4me.co.uk works.

Find plants for spring height aspect

 

 

 

 

 

The website is free to browse. However if you want to subscribe you can make visual plant lists ‘Plants I have’ and Plants I want’, plus you can add notes and print them with images. I hope this proves useful to Garden Designers, students and garden enthusiasts alike.

When you link to the demo the opening image will be fussy. This is because I’ve added linked from Youtube but I ca reassure you that the wesite is clear and sharp.

Each plant is accompanied with in-depth description, planting and pruning advice, images and some plants have time lapse sequences attached.

I hope you find the website useful. If you have images of plants that you’d like added to the site then please feel free to contact me neil@complete-gardens.co.uk. Together we can make the site grow into a comprehensive plant identification website.

Best wishes

Neil

The site


Right Plants 4 me. Free garden plant advice website

March 19, 2012

A year on and we’ve added and improved the www.rightplants4me.co.uk website.

It’s easy to find and identify garden plants as well as wildflowers and weeds.

Simply select plants by their name, flower and or leaf colour, period of interest, height, aspect and soil type.

You can nor make plants lists. (1) Plants I Have and (2) Plants I want

This is useful when designing your garden to have year round colour and interest.

You can print your plants I want lists and take it with you to the Garden Centre.

Plants I have shows you which plants you have in any chosen month AND it will also let you know which plants you have in any month that need pruning PLUS how to prune them correctly.

You can add your own personal note to any plant. I don’t like labels so I keep a record of my plants and where they are in the garden. This is very useful because for example Clematis look very similar when dormant, with my notes and reminder when to prune my plants I know exactly which Clematis needs pruning, where it is and how to prune it. Some need hard pruning becuase they flower on this years new growth whereas some flower on old wood.

Here is an Iris with a note added

I’ve added time lapses of plants growing and flowers opening. They show some of the fascinating growth and design.

I hope you fine the site useful.

I want to build the site so I’m keen to meet photographers and authors to help the site GROW.

Although the site has UK flowering and planting times, it won’t take too much work to make it specific for the US and European countries. Please let me know if this is of interest.

Best wishes

neil


Epigeal germination timelapse of bean growing

November 16, 2010

Here is a time-lapse of a climbing bean showing epigeal germination

The climbing bean was filmed growing in my studio over a period of 4-5 weeks.

Copyright Neil Bromhall

I’ve produced an interactive plant finder database with plant care and pruning advice with over 9,000 images.

Please see:- www.complete-gardens.co.uk

I have made an on-line interactive plant finder, identifier and pruning guide web site.  www.rightplants4me.co.uk which I hope you find interesting.

It has over 3,700 garden plants, 10,500 photographs plus time lapse sequences and each plant has in-depth plant care and illustrated pruning advice.

The plant database is continuing to grow.  If you have good quality photographs of garden plants that are not not already on the database I’d like to hear from you with an interest of adding it to the collection.

Contact me on neil@complete-gardens.co.uk


How to save and store tomato seeds

November 17, 2008
Saving seeds from ripe tomatoes
Saving seeds from ripe tomatoes

In order to get the best seeds you’ll need to collect from ripe, healthy tomato fruits.

Unripe tomatoes won’t have had enough time to produce mature seeds.
Cut or squash the tomatoes to extract the seeds.
Discard the flesh of the tomatoes, saving only the seeds.

Tomato seeds have a protective 'seed coat' which needs to be removed

Tomato seeds have a protective 'seed coat' which neds to be removed

The seeds will be surrounded by a jelly-like ‘seed coat’ which needs to be removed

To remove the protective seed coat, place the seeds in water

To remove the protective seed coat, place the seeds in water

The best way to get rid of the seed coat is to soak the seeds in water for 7-10 days.

Tomato seeds in water. Day 1

Tomato seeds in water. Day 1

 

The protective 'seed coat' has rotted away after ten days in water

The protective coat is disolved after 10 days in water

After this period most if not all the jelly will have rotted in the water leaving just the seeds.

Seive the seeds through a strainer

Seive the seeds through a strainer

Pour the seeds in to a seive and rinse with clean running water. A gentle rub with your fingers will seperate any remaining jelly.

Shake the seive to remove as much water as possible before tipping the seeds on to a piece of tissue paper. Seperate the seeds so that they are not touching each other and leave to dry for a further few days.

When dry the seeds can be stored on a dry paper bag

When dry the seeds can be stored in a dry paper bag

When completely dry place the seeds in a sealed paper bag and keep cool and dry, or you can use a sealed plastic bag and keep the seeds in a fridge (not the freezer).
Remember to lable the seeds.

Properly stored, the seeds can stay viable for a number of years.

Tomato advice is just one of the thousands of plant advice on the Complete Gardens CD-ROM


Free Garden advice Forum

August 15, 2008
Free Garden AdviceForum

Free Garden AdviceForum

The Free Complete Gardens Advice Forum continues to grow.

Based in the UK and running since 2003, our friendly group of garden enthusaists can help answer a wide range of subjects from plant identification, growing vegetables, garden pests and diseases to tried and tested garden tools or even suggest nice gardens to visit.

The forum is free and easy to join.

You can add images, ask questions or share your expertise.

There are Links to other interesting garden related blogs and websites

The leading contributors are awarded a free copy of the Award winning interactive garden advice and pruning guide CD-ROM as a ‘thank you’ for generously providing their time and expertise.

The forum is monitored for spam and content.

If you want some interesting gardening ideas or advice then please feel free to join us.


Saving the Allotment

February 3, 2008

The allotment        Grow your own vegetables

Allotment holders’ bid to save plots from housing plan.

Allotment holders across Oxford defiantly said they would dig for victory in the battle to save their plots from the treat of new houses.

Planners have identified three allotment sites on which 400 homes could be built in a confidential list of potential sites if demand for housing continues to soar. These new housing plans will spell disaster for what little green space is still left in Oxford. At a time when growing your own food is seen as increasingly important for people’s health and the environment we need to be opening more land for allotments, not slapping housing on ones that already exists. With the ever increasing demand for new housing the battle lies between the need for housing, as against protecting our important green spaces. In 2000 the city council, which rents allotments directly to associations, agreed a standard lease agreement until 2021 – effectively meaning allotments are free from development for another 14 years.

Most of the 36 city council-owed plots are bound by long-term leases, meaning they are free from development until at least 2020.

Allotments are incredibly valuable spaces. In addition to growing your own tasty vegetables which saves on carbon miles as the vegetables are locally grown rather than grown abroad, they keep you fit, are educational and save you money.