Epigeal germination timelapse of bean growing

November 16, 2010

Here is a time-lapse of a climbing bean showing epigeal germination

The climbing bean was filmed growing in my studio over a period of 4-5 weeks.

Copyright Neil Bromhall

I’ve produced an interactive plant finder database with plant care and pruning advice with over 9,000 images.

Please see:- www.complete-gardens.co.uk

I have made an on-line interactive plant finder, identifier and pruning guide web site.  www.rightplants4me.co.uk which I hope you find interesting.

It has over 3,700 garden plants, 10,500 photographs plus time lapse sequences and each plant has in-depth plant care and illustrated pruning advice.

The plant database is continuing to grow.  If you have good quality photographs of garden plants that are not not already on the database I’d like to hear from you with an interest of adding it to the collection.

Contact me on neil@complete-gardens.co.uk

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Hypogeal germination of broad bean and root growth

October 26, 2009

Here is a time lapse of a Broad bean showing hypogeal germination and root growth.

Hypogeal
‘Hypogeal’ means ‘underground’.
This is when the cotyledons of the germinating seed / bean remain below ground.
salts in the soil.

Roots and root hairs
The main functions of root are:
Absorption of water and nutrients,
Fixation of the plant to the soil,
Root bears unicellular root hairs.

Conduction of water and nutrients to aerial parts of plants

Root cap.

It is a cap-like structure at the tip of root. It cover and protects the growing point from injury as it pushes through the soil.

Filmed by Neil Bromhall www.rightplants4me.co.uk

More of my time-lapse sequences can be found on Youtube

I have made an on-line interactive plant finder, identifier and pruning guide web site.  www.rightplants4me.co.uk which I hope you find interesting.

It has over 3,600 garden plants, 10,000 photographs plus time lapse sequences and each plant has in-depth plant care and illustrated pruning advice.

The plant database is continuing to grow.  If you have good quality photographs of garden plants that are not not already on the database I’d like to hear from you with an interest of adding it to the collection.

Contact me on neil.bromhall@gmail.com


Tomato blight identification on fruit and what to do. Time-lapse

September 25, 2009

Tomato blight is weather-dependent and can be devastating during wet summers. Watch out for signs on outdoor tomatoes, which are most at risk; glasshouse tomatoes are less likely to become infected though the spores are carried in the wind and will enter through open windows and doors.

Tomato blight on leaf

Tomato blight on leaf

Early Blight can affect the foliage, stems and fruit of tomatoes.

Symptoms: Dark spots with concentric rings develop on older leaves first. The surrounding leaf area may turn yellow.

Affected leaves may die prematurely, exposing the fruits to sun scorching.
Management: Early Blight fungus overwinters in plant residue and is soil-borne. It can also come in on transplants. Remove affected plants and thoroughly clean fall garden debris. Wet weather and weak stressed plants increase the likelihood of attack. Copper and/or sulfur sprays can prevent further development of the fungus
Late Blight is caused by a fungus, Phytophthora infestans. It’s the same disease that led to the Irish potato famine almost 150 years ago.

The disease is not directly harmful to people as it only infects potatoes, tomatoes, and some related weeds, but it is not advised to eat the infected fruit or tubers.
It is important to catch any tomato disease early, before it spreads to all of your tomato plants and possibly other plants in the same family, such as potatoes, eggplants and peppers.
Look for brown, rapidly spreading patches on leaves and stems. The fruit, too, may show firm, quickly spreading brown patches followed by rotting. Infected parts die rapidly.
Destroy infected plants; but do not compost them as the plant residue is soil-borne and will spread the disease to your next years crop.
Late blight needs living plant tissue to survive, so infected tomato plants should be destroyed as soon as the disease is identified. In small gardens, this means removing plants in trash bags and sending them to the landfill;

By Time-lapse by Neil Bromhall www.rightplants4me.co.uk

I have made an on-line interactive plant finder, identifier and pruning guide web site.  http://www.complete-gardens-online.co.uk which I hope you find interesting.

It has over 3,600 garden plants, 10,000 photographs plus time lapse sequences and each plant has in-depth plant care and illustrated pruning advice.

The plant database is continuing to grow.  If you have good quality photographs of garden plants that are not not already on the database I’d like to hear from you with an interest of adding it to the collection.

Contact me on neil.bromhall@gmail.com


Time-lapse of Artichoke flower

September 12, 2009

Here is a time-lapse of an Artichoke flower. I think it’s fascinating.

Filmed on a 35mm Nikon D300 digital camera.

Filmed over a period of two days

 

Filmed for my interactive plant identification and pruning guide website www.rightplants4me.co.uk


Time-lapse of flowers and plants by Neil Bromhall

September 12, 2009


I add my time-lapses of plants, vegetables, flowers etc. to Youtube. I hope you find the different flower shapes and designs interesting.

I think that the artichoke flower fascinating.

Filmed for my interactive plant finder, identification and pruning guide website www.rightplants4me.co.uk


Runner bean germinating underground. Time-lapse epigeal germination

August 25, 2009

Here is a time-lapse of a runner bean germinating underground. This is an example of Epigeal germination where the cotyledons expand, throw off the seed shell and become photosynthetic above the ground.

Beans like other seeds need temperature and moisture to stimulate germination.

Stage 1:
Radicle expands and pushes against the testa at the micropyle
Testa spilts open and radicle emerges
Lateral roots develop
Root hairs form behind tip of radicle which helps absorb water and mineral salts in the soil

Stage 2
Stem below cotyledons elongates
Pulling cotyledon through soil and above the ground
Sometimes the is testa remains underground or discarded above ground
Cotyledons are closed together to protect the delicate pumule within

Stage 3
Cotyledons open up above ground
Cotyledons turn green
First foliage leaves start to develop
Foliage expands and turns green carrying out photosynthesis
Runner bean seedling is now a self-supporting plant

This and other of my time-lapses can be found on You tube http://www.youtube.com/user/neilbromhall

Time-lapse copyright Neil Bromhall. filmed for my plant identification website.  www.rightplants4me.co.uk


Pea seedling time lapse

April 20, 2009

I start my peas by putting them in a damp container. When I see the root starting to grow I know  which peas are viable and discard those which aren’t.

I plant the peas about 2.5cm (1 inch deep) in moist compost. Cover the pot to stop mice digging them up and eating them.

This time-lapse of pea seedlings shows what happens over a period of about 10 days.

When large enough to plant out,  you should put supports in for your peas to climb up.

Filmed for my website http://www.rightplants4me.co.uk